Fall 2019: Social Emotional Learning

This month we’re looking into the Child Development category. The articles we selected examine the concept of social emotional learning. What does it mean? Why is it important? How can we support it at the library? These are the questions we’re investigating this quarter.

Articles

Kimberly A. Schonert-Reichl (2019) Advancements in the Landscape of Social and Emotional Learning and Emerging Topics on the Horizon, Educational Psychologist, 54:3, 222-232, DOI: 10.1080/00461520.2019.1633925

Stephanie M. Jones, Michael W. McGarrah & Jennifer Kahn (2019) Social and Emotional Learning: A Principled Science of Human Development in Context, Educational Psychologist, 54:3, 129-143, DOI: 10.1080/00461520.2019.1625776

Discussion Group Meeting

Sunday, November 17th from 5:30 – 7:30 pm. The Vancouver group will be meeting at the Athlete’s Village Housing Co-op Common Room located at 151 W 1st Ave. Please email us for more details.

November 2017: Executive Function

For our first discussion we’re delving into the theme of child development with a look at the role of executive function in early childhood.

Articles

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University (2011). Building the Brain’s “Air Traffic Control” System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function: Working Paper No. 11. Retrieved from https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/building-the-brains-air-traffic-control-system-how-early-experiences-shape-the-development-of-executive-function/

Hot and Cool Executive Function: Foundations for Learning and Healthy Development. Meuwissen, Alyssa S. and Philip David Zelazo. Zero to Three Journal. November 2014 (Vol 35, No 2). Download here.

Discussion Group Meeting

Sunday, November 5th at 5:30 pm. Please email us for the Vancouver specific location.

Discussion Questions

Here are some suggested discussion questions to think about when reading through the pieces.

Critical Appraisal:

  • What were the key objectives of each article? Was their objective relevant to libraries?
  • What conclusions did the authors come to and were they just?
  • What were the strengths/weaknesses of the pieces? (I.e. Was there bias? Did they use credible sources? Were their data gathering methods sound?)

Current Practice:

  • Do the articles have value to us in our work with children and families at the library? (I.e. Is the information meaningful and/or applicable?)
  • How might the articles’ information on executive function influence future library practice?
  • What are the risks and benefits of applying this knowledge in our work with children and families?

Can’t Make It To the Meeting?

There’s lots of ways to get involved! Participate online: share your thoughts on social media using the hashtag #lscjournalclub. Or try hosting a journal club meeting in your local community. Let us know about it so we can spread the word. If you set up a local group, test your presentation skills by leading the discussion.

Leave a comment here with any questions or your thoughts about the articles.

Reflection Pieces

Read what others have to say about this month’s readings.